SITE MAP * HOME * ENFIELD & TRAINING RIFLES * TARGET RIFLES * SIGHTS * AIMING * TARGETS * LITERATURE * SUB-CALIBRE * SUB-TARGET * MISCELLANEOUS * BIBLIOGRAPHY * CHRONOLOGY * LINKS
YOU ARE VISITING THE PAGES OF THE U.K. N.R.A. HISTORIC ARMS RESOURCE CENTRE - MINIATURE CALIBRE RIFLES RESEARCH SITE - COPYRIGHT ©1997-


...........................................................................  


The Swiss SCHMIDT-RUBIN .22 RF TRAINING RIFLES

This page is still under construction, but we hope that there is enough information already here to make your visit worthwhile - mainly images at present

The Swiss nation has always held the sport of shooting in high esteem. Those partaking of shooting sports, of all disciplines, are understood to be perfectly normal, socially acceptable and patriotic persons, rather than the near pariahs with violent or warlike tendencies that they might unjustly be considered in some quarters of the World. The Swiss Government has, for decades, considered that every national should take part in the sport with a view to ensuring the security of the nation in the event of any outside aggression. A significant resulting additional benefit to this train of thought has been the internal security of the country. All young Swiss subjects are brought-up with firearms, and develop the associated discipline borne of correct training and an everyday familiarity with both military weapons and target arms. National Service, which each young adult is required to undertake, furthers this character building and the individual's self discipline. The nett profit from this, apart from the Swiss nation's acknowledged ability to remain uninvaded for centuries past, has been the lowest level of firearms crime almost anywhere in the world, (their crime statistics in this area are the best of any nation where firearms ownership is readily available to the population - and far better than some places where it isn't!). Nationals involved in training, or otherwise serving in the various aspects of the military and volunteer forces, may keep their service arms at home so that they are readily accessible both in an emergency and on the frequent occasions that the opportunity arises to shoot for target competition or training purposes. No better example of how firearms possession and public safety can go hand in hand exists anywhere. It is never simply what you do that counts, but the way in which it is done!

The Schmidt-Rubin rifle has been the main-stay of the Swiss military since the Nineteenth Century. In later guises it is today still to be found in service of some manner or other, even if only as a semi-retired training arm.

Small-bore conversions were made, both of the turn-of-the-Nineteenth-Century long rifles and, earlier in the Twentieth Century, of the carbines. We show examples of both on this page. ( Long rifle images to follow).

Below are images of a .22LR rimfire converted 1911 carbine. The rifle therefore retains the "mighty" bolt of the full-bore parent arm; a straight-pull arrangement not dissimilar to that of the Canadian Ross rifle. ( See the straight-pull Ross Cadet Rifle). For anyone unclear as to the meaning of the term "straight-pull", it simply refers to a bolt opening and closing system in which the bolt handle is merely drawn or pulled straight backwards and pushed forwards to respectively open, or to close and lock, the action for loading. The more usual of bolt-actioned rifles require that a turning motion be applied, to the bolt-handle, to lock and unlock the bolt to to or from the action on opening or closing. The Ross rifle and the Swiss Schmidt-Rubin rifle are the most well known designs of this nature.

With both the Schmidt-Rubin and Ross full-bore service rifles, the main body of the bolt has a machined part-helix which permits the fore and aft movement of the bolt within the action, whilst at the same time imparting a rotating motion to the component of the bolt which spins to lock the action for safety in firing. With the Schmidt-Rubin, an outer sleeve over the bolt-body carries the locking lugs, the whole sleeve rotating about the bolt-body and bolt-head components. The Ross utilises a similar technique, but the forward threaded locking lugs are part of the bolt-head, which itself rotates, engaging with an interrupted internal thread in the breech of the action. The small dimensions of the bolt for the Ross Cadet rifle do not permit such complexity, and that rifle, whilst emulating the straight-pull of its big brother, has a simple locking arrangement possible by virtue of the low pressure combustion of a small-bore rimfire cartridge.

Below: top; the early 1889 full-bore long rifle.

Bottom; the 1911 (Karabiner 1911) carbine converted, by sleeving the barrel, to .22LR rimfire for small-bore training use.

Below: the carbine - LHS

....................

Below: the full-bore bolt-head, and.................................. the small-bore bolt-head.

.........................

The bolt viewed from above .............................................. and below.

....................

Below:

The firing ( striker) arrangement.

The rear-sight, from above, showing the original full-bore calibration in metres .......................................................................................................

......................................................... and the Left and RH sides, the same! No recalibration has been applied for the miniature calibre ammunition.

........................

We are awaiting images of a 1911 Long Rifle and a K31 carbine, each in .22RF calibre

Return to: SITE MAP or MENU PAGE or TOP of PAGE

 

Get your counter