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THE "FLASHSPOTTER" RIFLE & SPOTLIGHT-PROJECTOR

See also: Aim teaching devices


These two training devices enjoyed comparatively limited use, but were not entirely without merit or gainful employment.

The Flashspotter is oddly named in that the inference most likely drawn from its description would be that it is intended to assist with the task of 'flash spotting' - usually understood to be the detection of the location of muzzle flash from a fired weapon. The meaning actually intended by the name given in fact relates to the spotting of the point of aim of a firearm "by means of an attached or integrally beamed and focussed flash of light".

In his book "The British Sniper", Ian Skennerton describes this equipment as a "counter-sniper device" which "produces a muzzle flash, and one of its purposes was to draw enemy sniper fire".

That the Flashspotter might have been used in this way is a possibility perhaps, but almost any suitable light source, properly directed, would have achieved similar results; however, the warrior's ingenuity in the field knows no bounds. The patent for the design clearly indicates its purpose to be the projection of a light point onto a target for safe aiming practice, the text stating that" a spot of bright light will be projected upon the target in a position at which it would have been struck by a bullet had the rifle really been fired at the time the trigger was pulled. This enables the accuracy with which the rifle was sighted to be easily tested in any suitable place without the necessary for actually firing the same and consequently avoiding all danger or the necessity for taking special precautions against it. "

The Patent and Nameplate showing British Patent Number 243249 which dates back to 1925, although the rifle itself is no doubt of rather later vintage, and probably Second World War (1939 - 45).

With the 'barrel removed it is possible to view and change the bulb, which is located in the 'receiver' at its forward end.

The 'barrel' contains only a small lens complex for focussing the light beam.

There is a slot, about four inches long in the bottom of the barrel, through which a locking screw protrudes to permit fore and aft focus adjustment for the distance to the target.

With the trigger-guard removed, it is possible to see the wiring from the trigger switch going forward to the bulb and the battery terminals, one under and one to the right hand side of the fore-end woodwork.

Apparent in the image below are marks bearing a similarity to inspection or contractors stamps.

We have, as yet, been unable to undentify both these .............,

.............. and the marks on the underside of the 'receiver' in front of the trigger.

The comprehensive 1925 patent extract for both the integral Flashspotter rifle and alternative separate projector unit is copied at the bottom of the page.

In 2003, during a period when the hand-in of firearms and edged weapons was being encouraged, Northumbria Police advised the press that

" Amongst those given to officers for destruction or to be made safe were a BB gun made to look like a self loading automatic pistol and a Flashspotter Infantry Rifle, made in 1935."

The example shown on this page is the only one that has ever come to our notice, so, perhaps not all the aspects of removing "firearms" from the populace are entirely positive. The report hardly shows such policing in an historically sympathetic or appreciative light. Confirmation of the dating of one of these unusual training devices is about the only worthwhile outcome of this particular incident.


THE SPOTLIGHT PROJECTOR

This is a similar device to the Flashspotter rifle, but is a separate unit capable of being fitted to any number of different small-arms. One of its principle uses was to teach the 'lead' required when firing on moving targets, and its use was comprehensively detailed in two Small Arms Training pamphlets, Volume I, No.6 - Anti-Aircraft, and No.21 - The Machine Carbine.

Replication of the relevant sections of these manuals is to be found on this page.

Below, the unit is shown attached to a Lee-Enfield Pattern '18 in .22 Rimfire calibre.

The focussing lens is evident at the front of the device

and, at the rear, the terminals to which the instructor's pressel switch is connected.

The focussing of the spot beam is achieved by sliding the telescoped sections of the projector and then locking up the knurled knob on the slide slot.

The projector and its adaptors were issued in a strong wooden box - shown below.

 

The items in this particular kit, from left to right, are the wiring harness and Bakelite pressel switch, the three components for clamping the projector to the Lewis Gun, the bracket for mounting the unit on the S.M.L.E. rifle, and the projector itself.

The bracket for the S.M.L.E. rifle could also be used with various machine guns when utilised with other adapting brackets. These can be seen in the manual extract below.

A wiring diagram is pasted into the lid to ensure correct connection between the components and the accumulators which, contemporary with the early 1940s, would probably have been glass cased lead-acid batteries with the terminals sealed at the top in pitch.

Extract from the Small Arms Training pamphlet, Volume I, No.6 - Anti-Aircraft - pages 33 to 39, starting at Section 7.

Spotlight projector. The apparatus consists of :
i. (a) A projector fitted with an electric bulb and a focusing device.
(b) Brackets to attach the projector to
The rifle.
The L.M.G. (Bren or Lewis according to the gun with which the unit is armed).
(c) A D.P. rifle adapted for use with the projector.



(d) A spare pistol grip, to which is fitted a switch device and an electric lead and two clips.
(e) A transformer in a special box, with an electric lead fitted with an adaptor, and a two-pin socket. This box should not be opened.
(f) An electric lead, fitted with a pear switch, two " spade " ends, two " pin " ends, and a two-pin plug.
ii. The spotlight projector (see Figure 15) is fitted to the special rifle as follows :—
(a) Attach the bracket to the rifle on the. bayonet boss and standard Clamp the bracket firmly by tightening the wing nut between the bayonet boss and the standard..
(b) Remove the spindle on the front of the bracket by unscrewing the wing nut, put the pivot of the pro¬jector between the wings of the bracket so that the projector is under the barrel with the ;terminals towards the butt. Replace the spindle, passing it through the hole in the pivot of the projector, and screw it up firmly.
(c) Attach the electric lead (i. (f) above) to the rifle and the projector. The two " spade " ends fit on td_ terminals on the projector, and the two " pin " ends, on to the terminals on the rifle.


35
(d) 'Insert the two-pin plug into the socket on the trans former box.
(c) having first ascertained that the controlling switch is Off, remove the bulb from a convenient electric
light, and inert the adaptor of the transformer.
Switch on the current to the light, and the projector is ready for use. When the trigger is pressed or the pear switch is operated, a spot of light will be pro¬jected from the projector.
iii. The spotlight is fitted to the Bren gun as follows (see Figure 17)
(a) The attachment is fitted to the pistol grip.
(b)• Attach the bracket to the muzzle of the Bren gun by unscrewing and removing the wing nut, slipping the hinged portion_ over the barrel, and pushing it back until the ring of the bracket fits over the flash eliminator. Replace the wing nut and screw up firmly..
(c) Fasten the lead from the pistol grip to the milled head screw on the rear of the block on the bracket, and

secure the lead to the top of the barrel with the two clips provided.
(d) The projector is fitted to the bracket in the same manner as for the rifle. The electric lead is also connected in the same manner, except that the
pin " ends are in this case connected to the terminals on the bracket.

(e) Continue 'as in ii. (d) and (e) above. (see Figure 18).
iv. The spotlight projector is. fitted to the Lewis gun as follows :
(a) Replace the pistol grip on the gun with the special pistol grip issued for the spotlight projector.
(b) Attach the spotlight projector bracket to the gun as follows :—
Insert the small end cif the arm of the bracket under the sling swivel from the front so that the wings point towards the muzzle and the thickened portion of the small end is towards the radiator casing. Unscrew the clamping screw of the band and slide the band, with the heads of the two

terminals towards the butt, over the front radiator casing, pushing it back until the hole in the band corresponds with the hole in the arm of the bracket. Insert the clamping screw and clamp tightly.


{c) Pass the lead from the trigger under the band of tile anti-aircraft holder and the field mount, and attach it to the milled head screw on the front of the block on the bracket.


(d) As in iii. (d) above.
(e) Continue as in iii. (d) and (e) above (see Figure 20).
v. The transformer is issued complete in its box with all necessary connections made. No alterations will be made to the internal wiring of the box. Any necessary repairs must be made by an electrician.
vi. To focus the light from the projector, unscrew the small milled head screw under the barrel of the projector a few turns, and slide it backwards and forwards until a small clear ring of light is thrown. Clamp by screwing tightly.
vii. To .register the projector for aiming at diving and climbing targets, place the rifle in an aiming rest, slightly loosen the wing nut on the top of the projector and the wing nut on the wings of the bracket. Take a correct aim at a target and clamp the aiming rest firmly. Press the trigger, and order an assistant to move the projector until the spot rests on the point of aim. Clamp the projector. Check correctness of registration and adjust as necessary.
viii, To register the projector for aiming at crossing aero¬planes, use two marks painted on the screen (see paragraph 6 (ii)), six feet eight inches apart. With the rifle on the rest or the gun on the tripod, order one man to aim at the left of the two marks and then register the light on the right-hand mark as in vii. above. The centre of the rest or tripod to be 10 yards from the screen.
8. Moving target for spotlight projector (see Figure 21).
i. The target described below has been designed for use indoors with the spotlight projector. it is capable of a con¬siderable range of speeds, which can be varied from one and a half feet a second up to about six feet a second. In addition, it can be used at angles other than the horizontal, in order to give a diving effect to the target. it is easily reversible ; only a short time is necessary to change the weights- and reverse the model aeroplane.
The most suitable range. at which to use the target is ten yards, both from the point of view of the spotlight projector and the best speed of the target.
The model aeroplane should be as light as possible. It should be six inches long and eight and a half inch wing span. Stiff drawing paper is the best material for the purpose. The most suitable length of run is 20-24 feet, but this may have to

(e) Continue as in ii. (d) and (e) above. (see Figure IS).
iv:. The spotlight projector is fitted to the Lewis gun as follows : —
(a) Replace the pistol grip on the gun with the special pistol grip issued for the spotlight projector.
(b) Attach the spotlight projector- bracket to the gull as follows :
Insert the small end (.4 the arm of the bracket under the sling swivel from the front so that the wings point towards the muzzle and the thickened portion of the small end is towards the radiator casing. Unscrew the clamping screw of the band and slide the band, with the heads of the two

terminals towards the butt, over the front radiator casing; pushing it back until the hold in the band corresponds with the hole in the arm of the bracket. Insert the clamping screw and clamp tightly.


be. shortened when the run is not horizontal if insufficient vertical drop is available, at one end of the run..
ii. Description of target.—Two front wheel hubs and spindles of an ordinary bicycle form the pulleys for the target. The oiling caps arc removed. Round blocks of wood, with holes of the same diameter as that of the hubs of the wheels bored through their centres, are halved and glued in position on one half of the hubs. Three screws through the spoke holes retain the blocks in their correct positions. The pulleys are then turned on a lathe to the shape and dimensions shown in Figure 21.


The hubs are set opposite to one another in brackets. An endless cord of mattress thread is run round the two wooden pulleys, and the model aeroplane is hung on the lower thread. A second cord, also of mattress thread, is run over the metal part of the hubs, with two weights of 12 ounces, each hung at either end of the cord. The length of this cord should be so adjusted that, when one weight is resting on the ground, the other is against the stop close to the pulley.
A complete turn should w t be taken round the hub with the weight cord ; this introduces friction, and is quite un¬necessary.
Screens should be erected in front to hide the mechanism and track, and behind to show up the spot.
iii. Method of using target.—
(a) See that the endless cord* is not too tight. A tight cord increases the friction in the hubs. The results of such friction are :--
(i) Jerky movement.
(ii) A large bias is required to move the model (see (e) below).
(iii) It is impossible to run the target at a very low speed.
(b) See that plenty of play (711, inch) is allowed in the cones of the bearings, and that they are kept well oiled. If this is not done, the same defects as given under (a) above are obtained.
(c) Arrange the two 12-ounce weights in such a way that one, called No. 1, is at the highest, and the other, called No. 2, is at the lowest point of its run.
(d) Fix the aeroplane to the lower part of the endless cord at the end near the No. 1 weight.
(e) •Add rider weights to No. 1 weight until the aeroplane begins to move, then add two or more small rider weights until the aeroplane moves at a speed of six and two-thirds feet a second. With the gun at 10 yards range this represents an aeroplane at 400 yards travelling at 180 m.p.h. The number of small rider weights to be added will depend on the tension of the cord and the working condition of the hub and pulley. Adding weight to the No. 1 weight increases the speed. Adding weight to the No. 2 weight decreases the speed.
(f) After the run, return the aeroplane to its original position by pulling down No. 2 weight, not by lifting No. 1 weight.
(g) To reverse the direction of the run, reverse the aeroplane. The original No. 1 weight now becomes No. 2 weight, and vice versa.
* The tension of this cord varies to some degree with the weather.

The Projector unit was approved for fitment to the Lewis gun, Bren light machine gun and Sten and Thompson sub-machine guns amongst other weapons.

Here follows an xtract from the Small Arms Training pamphlet, Volume I, No.21 - The Machine Carbine - pages 21 to 27

APPENDIX A
THE THOMPSON SUB-MACHINE GUN M.1 (U.S. MODEL)
Troops operating with American forces may meet this weapon, which, in the U.S. Army, is replacing the various types of Thompson machine carbines already described in this pamphlet. The M.1 differs from the earlier types in many respects, the most important of which are :
(a) The fixed backsight consists of an aperture and a " U " sight.
(b) The butt cannot be detached from the pistol grip.
(c) No " H " piece or felt pads are incorporated.
(d) The cocking handle is similar to that of the Sten and fits into the right side of the bolt.
(e) The buffer is not integral with the buffer rod ; this simplifies stripping considerably.
Stripping.—Remove the butt and pistol grip together (see Thomp¬son, Lesson 3). Press in the rear end of the buffer rod and lift out the buffer. Maintain pressure on the rod and draw the bolt back till its front end is behind the slots in the body. (This will prevent distortion of the spring.) Remove the rod and spring under control. Draw the bolt back till the cocking handle is in line with the enlarged recess in the cocking handle slot. Depress the firing pin hammer, raise the bolt slightly, and remove the cocking handle. Draw the bolt back and lift out.
Assembling.—Replace bolt and cocking handle. Draw the bolt back as for removing the spring. Replace the spring and buffer rod, being careful not to distort the spring. Maintaining pressure on the rod, ease the bolt slowly forward, and replace the buffer. Replace the pistol grip and butt.
Cleaning.—As in Thompson, Lesson 3, except that graphited grease need not be used since there is no " H " piece. Note also that the bolt must be kept well oiled, because there are no felt pads in the body to act as oil reservoirs.
APPENDIX B
FITTING OF THE SPOTLIGHT PROJECTOR
1. For the spotlight projector see Pamphlet No. 6. The apparatus can easily be fitted to the Thompson and Sten machine carbines
with a few simple additional fittings.



2. Plates 10 and 11 show the projector fitted to the Thompson with horizontal foregrip and no compensator. The only additional requirements are :
(a) A trigger guard clip.
(b) A lead clip. (See
(c) A thin metal plate and 2 wood screws. Plate 12
(d) Two suitable lengths of insulated wire.
In addition, the spotlight bracket issued for the No. 1 rifle must be modified by the drilling of a small hole 1 in. from the bottom of the slot which fits on to the bayonet standard (Plate 13).

1. Bracket for use with vertical foregrip and compensator.
2. Thin metal plate and two wood screws.
3. Lead clip.
4. Trigger guard clip.



To assemble the apparatus :
Screw the bracket into the underside of the foregrip with the metal plate and wood screws. Screw the terminal block into the right side of the foregrip.
Fit the trigger guard clip to the trigger guard. (This clip must be insulated so that the small contact screw does not make contact with the trigger guard through the clip). Fit the lead clip to the body behind the pistol grip.
Connect the extra leads to the terminals : connect the other ends to the trigger guard and lead clips. Attach the projector and main leads as for the rifle.
3. Plate 14 shows the projector fitted to the Thompson with vertical foregrip and compensator. In this case a special bracket is necessary (Plate 12). To assemble : fit the bracket to the projector. Slide the bracket over the compensator and tighten the screw. Proceed as in para. 2 (from " Screw the terminal block, etc." to the end of the paragraph).
4. Plates 15 and 16 show the projector fitted to the Sten Mark II.




Additional fittings required are :
(a) A special bracket.
(b) A terminal block with spring clip.
(See
(c) An insulated trigger guard clip (as in 2 (a) above,
Plate 17)
modified to fit the Sten trigger guard).
(d) Two short lengths of insulated wire.
To assemble :
Fit the bracket over the muzzle and tighten the screw. Fit the terminal block in its clip over the magazine housing. Fit the trigger guard clip to the trigger guard, as in para. 2 above.
Connect the extra leads to the terminals ; connect the other ends to the trigger guard clip and to the screw at the front of the trigger mechanism casing.
Attach the projector to the special bracket and connect main leads as for the rifle.
NOTE.—The scale of spotlight projectors is detailed in A.C.I. 567 of 1940 (see reprint notified in A.C.I. 1732 of 1943).

 


FLASHSPOTTER RIFLE & PROJECTOR PATENT OF 1925

An Improved Indicating Device for use in connection with the Sighting of Fire-arms.

We, JOHN WILLIAM FRASER LAMONT, of 217A, Kensington High Street, London, 1V. 8, and HERBERT _DICKINSON, of 2, Jasper Road, Norwood, London, S.E. 19, British subjects, do hereby declare the nature of this invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, to be particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement :—
Our invention relates to an improved indicating device adapted for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms. This is intended to show the degree of is correctness in the sighting of the firearm by momentarily projecting upon the target a spot of light, the projection of which is controlled by the trigger of the fire-arm.
The object of this invention is to pro vide a simple and improved device of this type adapted to be readily fitted to almost any existing type of fire-arm and embodying an improved form of electrical contact adapted to be actuated by or through the firing mechanism thereof so as to close an electric circuit momentarily and to thus illuminate an electric lamp which projects a spot of light through a suitable system of reflectors and optical leas or lenses onto the target so as to indicate the spot on which the fire-arm was aimed.
According to this invention, we employ a simple form of electrical contact comprising a slidable weight adapted to be actuated through the hammer or bolt of the fire-arm or through the momentum or impact thereof so as to cause the weight to slide and to engage contacts so as to complete an electrical circuit through a small electric lamp connected with a suitable battery mounted upon the fire-arm or carried by the user. Suitable spring or other means are employed to return the slidable weight and again break contact so as to extinguish the lamp. A reflector and suitable lens or lenses are provided so as to project the light from the lamp in the required direction. The slidable contact device and the light and optical system for its projection are preferably embodied in a single unit, such for instance as a tubular casing or upon a single base. In he case of a sporting gun or like firearm, the hammer or its equivalent may strike directly upon the sliding weight or upon a pin or connection adapted to transmit the impact of the hammer or its equivalent thereto so as to actuate the weight and close the electrical circuit momentarily at the required time. When it is required to fit our improved device to a rifle of the well known service pattern, the contact device and the optical system may be connected up as a unit in a suitable tubular or other casing adapted to be secured as an attachment to the exterior of the rifle as for instance by attaching its two ends to the usual sling clips provided on the fore part of the rifle. In this case the slidable weight is very delicately balanced and is adapted to be operated to close the circuit through the impact of the bolt of the rifle when this is released. The resultant jar of the released bolt will be communicated through the rifle so as to cause the delicately balanced weight to ove under the influence of the momentum imparted to it so as to close the circuit momentarily, a suitable spring acting to return the weight almost at once. In this manner no actual alterations are necessary to the rifle itself and no connection need be made to its mechanism. In fitting the device into a sporting gun or the like in which the bore of the barrel or the chamber for the reception of the cartridges is of considerable dimension, our improved device may be made to fit in the breech of. the gun in the place of a cartridge. The voltage or current for illuminating the lamp may be considerably above the normal for which the latter is intended so as to obtain the desired brilliance during the exceedingly short period for which the lamp is illuminated.
In order that our invention may be clearly understood, reference is made to the accompanying drawings in which:—
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a service rifle with one form of our improved device fitted thereto as an attachment.
Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section showing a suitable arrangement of the device used in Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a part sectional view of a sporting gun showing our improved device fitted within the barrel thereof.
Fig. 4 is a part sectional elevation to an enlarged scale of the device fitted in the breech of the sporting gun, and
Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic arrangement of a suitable form of sliding contact device and electrical lamp according to our inventon.
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, our improved indicating device 1 is arranged as a unit in a tubular casing and is shown fitted to a standard service pattern rifle 2 being connected to the bands 3 and 4 on the fore part of the rifle and which usually act as clips for securing the sling. Electric leads 5 extend from the rear end of the device to a suitable electrical battery or other source of current which may be carried on the person of the user or mounted on the rifle or in any other suitable position.
The construction of the indicating device 1 is shown in Fig. 2, and com prises an outer tubular casing 10 fitted with a projector lens 11 at its forward end and a reflector 12 in a suitable position along its length. In front of the reflector is supported a small electric light bulb 14 so that when this is illuminatedthe light from the reflector will be projected by the lens 11 so as to be focussed in a bright spot upon the target, at which the rifle is directed. If desired, a suitable condenser 15 may be provided between the lamp 14 and the projector lens 11, but this may be omitted if desired. In the latter case, the reflector 12 will be suitably formed to act as a combined reflector lens.
In the rear portion of the casing 10 is supported the electrical contact device comprising a block of insulating material 20 in which is supported a pair of contact blades 21, each of which are connected in circuit with the lamp and an electric battery. Centrally mounted in the block 20 is a spindle 22 upon which is arranged the contact weight 23, whilst the rear end of the spindle 22 engages in a guide plate 24. A suitable fine spring 25 is interposed between the contact weight 23 and the block 20 so as to normally hold the former out of contact with the blades 21. The front end of the spindle 22 is screw-threaded and provided with an adjusting nut 26 by means of which the position of the weight 23 may be adjusted. The cap 27 in the rear end of the casing 10 is provided with an opening 2S through which the leads upon the battery may pass. If desired, the casing 10 may be made in two parts separable near the end of the block 20 so as to facilitate access to the nut 26 or 85 for other purposes.
The slidable contact weight 23 is adapted to be actuated by the impact of the bolt 6 of the rifle when this is released by the trigger 7. In the usual service pattern rifle, the force of impact of the bolt 6 when released is sufficient to cause the slidable weight 23 to move toward and engage the two blades 21 so as to close the electric 95 circuit through the lamp 14. The effect is however, only momentary, and the spring 25 again returns it to its original position, breaking the contact so that the lamp will only be illuminated for a very short period. The result of this is that a spot of bright light will be projected upon the target in a position at which it would have been struck by a bullet had the rifle really been fired at the time the trigger was pulled. This enables the accuracy with which the rifle was sighted to be easily tested in any suitable place without the necessary for actually firing the same and consequently avoiding all danger or the necessity for taking special precautions against it.
Referring now to Figs. 3 and 4, these show the application of our improved device to a sporting gun in which the slidable contact weight. is actuated directly by the mechanism of the gun. The sporting gun 30 is provided with a suitable projection lens 31 in the barrel thereof, and an electric lamp 32 and reflector 33 are arranged in the barrel toward the breech end thereof. In the actual breech of the gun is fitted a, slid- able contact device in such a manner that the actual firing mechanism of the gun will actuate the weight directly when it is released by the trigger 34. In the sectional view shown in Fig. 4, the block 40 of insulating material supports the two contact blades 41 and the spindle 42 carrying the slidable contacts 43. A spring 44 is provided between the weight and the block 40, and a nut 45 is provided on the screw-threaded end of the 5 spindle 44 for adjustment purposes. In the end of the breech is provided a cap 46 having a loosely fitting pin 47 therein, the outer end of which projects slightly from the cap and is located so that it will be struck sharply by the end of the firing lever 48 when this is released by the trigger 34. This arrangement applies to the type of sporting gun known as a hammerless type, but it is to be under stood that the actual hammer may serve the same purpose in the type of sporting gun so fitted. The impact of the firing lever 48 on the loose pin 47 will cause it to strike sharply upon the slidable weight 43 moving it into contact with the two blades 41 so as to close the circuit and cause the electric lamp to be illuminated. Sufficient clearance is however, left between the end of the loose pin 46 and 25 the end of the slidable weight 43 to permit the latter to return under the influence of the spring and so again break the circuit and extinguish the lamp automatically.
In Fig. 5 is shown a diagrammatic arrangement in which a lamp 50 and lens reflector 51 are mounted upon a baseboard 52 of insulating material. A pair of contact blades 53 and 54 are also arranged on the base board 52 and connected in circuit with the lamp and a suitable source of electric current. Slid- ably mounted in guides 55 is a spindle 56 carrying upon its end the slidable plate 57 and having a coil spring 58 arranged around the spindle and between one of the guides 55, and an adjustable nut 59 on the spindle. Movement of the slide able weight 57 may be effected by an actual blow upon the end of the spindle 56 so as to cause the weight 57 to strike against the contact blade 54 so as to bring it into engagement with the other contact blade 53 to complete the circuit.
Instead of a direct blow upon the spindle 56, the momentum caused by the impact of some other movable part such as the bolt of a rifle may be employed for causing the slidable weight to move in the desired manner.
Whilst our improved device has been described in detail as applied to small arms such as rifles, sporting guns and the like it is to be understood that it may be equally well applied in connection with larger fire-arms such as ordnance, machine guns and the like.
Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of our said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, we declare that what we claim is:-
1. An improved indicating device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms comprising an electric lamp connected in circuit with a source of current and a pair of contact blades adapted to be closed by means of a slidable weight actuated by the mechanism of the gun when released by the operating trigger, and a suitable optical system for projecting the light from this lamp so as to momentarily produe a spot of light upon the target when the electrical circuit is closed.
2. In an improved indicating device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms according to Claim- 1, arranging the slidable weight to be operated directly by the impact of the hammer of the gun or its equivalent which is arranged to strike a direct blow upon the slidable weight so as to cause it to engage the contact blades against the action of a spring which subsequently returns it and again breaks the circuit.
3. In a device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms according to Claim 2, arranging the slidable weight to be actuated indirectly through the impact caused by the release of a bolt of a rifle or its equivalent, which impact will set up a momentum in the weight causing it to engage the contact blades against the action of a spring which will return it and again break circuit.
4. In a device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms according to Claim 2, arranging the electrical contact device in the form of a pair of con tact blades supported upon an insulating base and connected in the electrical circuit, a centrally disposed pin upon which is mounted the slidable weight, a light coil spring interposed between the weight and the base and a loose pin mounted in a suitable guide and adapted to receive the direct blow of the striker or hammer of the gun and to in turn impart this to the slidable weight so as to cause it to momentarily engage the contact blades, substantially as described.
5. In a device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms according to Claim 3, arranging the lamp and optical system in the forward part of a casing preferably of tubular form in the rear end of which is arranged the circuit closing device comprising a block having a pair of spring blades, a slidable weight mounted on a pin axially disposed between them and supported at its free end in a suitable guide, the weight being sufficiently sensitively mounted 'so that the momentum set up by the impact of a bolt of a rifle or its equivalent will cause the weight to momentarily engage the contact and close the circuit, a suitable spring being provided to normally hold the weight out of engagement, and the whole device being arranged in the manner of an attachment adapted to be fitted to the exterior of a fire-arm without alteration thereto.
6. The improved device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms substantially as described in the specification with reference to Figs. 1 and 2 of the accompanying sheet of illustrative draw ings.
7. The improved 'device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms substantially as described in the specification with reference to Figs. 3 and 4 of the accompanying sheet of illustrative drawings.
8. The improved device for use in connection with the sighting of fire-arms substantially as described in specification with reference to Fig. 5 of the accompanying sheet of illustrative drawings.


Dated this 26th day of May, 1925.
RAYNER & Co.,
5, Chancery Lane, London, W.C. 2, Agents for the Applicants.

Redhill: Printed for His Majesty's Stationery Office, by Love & Malcomson, Ltd.-1925.



See also: Aim teaching devices

 

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